Citizenship in a Globalized World

Citizenship in a Globalized World

This course examines our increasingly interconnected – yet stubbornly fragmented and unequal – world, and asks how we might conscientiously choose to live and act in it.

Course Details

January 17 – February 28
Tuesdays, 5:00 – 7:00 PM

Why Take This Course?

This course examines our increasingly interconnected – yet stubbornly fragmented and unequal – world, and asks how we might conscientiously choose to live and act in it. Drawing on the fields of comparative political and economic development, we will explore the cross-national patterns of behavior by states and private actors that are shaping outcomes in education, growth, social inclusion, and political participation. We will complement this empirical study with normative perspectives drawn from the fields of philosophy, social and cultural analysis, and theology, ultimately pushing each of ourselves to decide on concrete ways our convictions can shape our choices about how to live as aware and responsible citizens in the world as it exists today.

Readings will be composed of two texts each week, one drawn from the empirical study of comparative political and economic development, and another drawn from the normative theory or analysis. Emphasis will be placed on linking the material to Georgetown’s history, values, and student experience (both academic and extra-curricular). Readings may include empirical work from Thomas Piketty, Steven Levitsky and Lucan Way, and Kathleen McNamara, and normative texts from Ta-Nehesi Coates, Pope Francis, Georgetown’s Working Group on Slavery, Memory and Reconciliation, the Society of Jesus’ Working Group on Economic Justice, as well as other sources.

Fr. Matthew Carnes, S.J., is an associate professor in the Department of Government and the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, and he currently serves as the Director of the Center for Latin American Studies.

His research examines the dynamics of labor and social welfare policy in developing and middle-income countries. A specialist on Latin America, he has conducted extensive field research in Argentina, Peru, Chile, and Bolivia, and he has worked on development projects in Honduras, Mexico, Uruguay, Paraguay, and Ecuador. He is the author of Continuity Despite Change: The Politics of Labor Regulation in Latin America (Stanford University Press, 2014), and numerous journal articles.

A distinguished educator, he has received three of Georgetown University’s highest teaching awards, including Georgetown College’s Edward B. Bunn, S.J. Award (2017 and 2011), given by graduating seniors of the College; the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service Faculty of the Year Award (2013), given by the SFS Academic Council; and the University-wide Dorothy Brown Award for Outstanding Teaching Achievement (2011). In 2012, he was featured as one of the country’s best professors in the Princeton Review’s publication, 300 Best Professors.

In recent years, he has been a Visiting Fellow at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at the University of Notre Dame (Spring 2009) and a National Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University (Academic Year 2011-2012).

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